hifas:

An archaic memory we are born with, 2012 by Hayley Barker

hifas:

An archaic memory we are born with, 2012 by Hayley Barker

ryanpanos:

Scaffolding II by Atelier Olschinsky

tumblropenarts:

The Alchemist
36 x 36”, Oil, Acrylic, Spray Paint On Canvas
A new painting series exploring mix media techniques, colour and form. Please check out my blog and contact with any questions.
Thanks,
Jack

tumblropenarts:

The Alchemist

36 x 36”, Oil, Acrylic, Spray Paint On Canvas

A new painting series exploring mix media techniques, colour and form. Please check out my blog and contact with any questions.

Thanks,

Jack

(via le-moon)

infoneer-pulse:

Unknown language found stamped in ancient clay tablet

In deciphering the tablet seen above, John MacGinnis of the University of Cambridge found that many of the names on the list are not from any currently known ancient language. “One or two are actually Assyrian and a few more may belong to other known languages of the period, such as Luwian or Hurrian,” he says, “but the great majority belong to a previously unidentified language.”

» via New Scientist

infoneer-pulse:

Unknown language found stamped in ancient clay tablet

In deciphering the tablet seen above, John MacGinnis of the University of Cambridge found that many of the names on the list are not from any currently known ancient language. “One or two are actually Assyrian and a few more may belong to other known languages of the period, such as Luwian or Hurrian,” he says, “but the great majority belong to a previously unidentified language.”

» via New Scientist

(via 6stronghands)

Claude Monet - The Saint-Lazare Station, 1877

In 1877, settling in the Nouvelle Athènes area, Claude Monet asked for permission to work in the Gare Saint-Lazare that marked its boundary on one side. Indeed, this was an ideal setting for someone who sought the changing effects of light, movement, clouds of steam and a radically modern motif. From there followed a series of paintings with different viewpoints including views of the vast hall. In spite of the apparent geometry of the metallic frame, what prevails here is really the effects of colour and light rather than a concern for describing machines or travellers in detail. Certain zones, true pieces of pure painting, achieve an almost abstract vision. 

“You can hear the trains rumbling in, see the smoke billow up under the huge roofs….That is where painting is today….Our artists have to find the poetry in train stations, the way their fathers found the poetry in forests and rivers” - Emile Zola about Monet’s paintings.

(via honeydewyouloveme-deactivated20)

dursyboy:

The ReaperJoan Miro1937(oil on celotex panels)The Reaper was commissioned by the Spanish Pavilion and was geared towards gaining the support of Republican Spain in an effort to overcome Fransisco Franco’s fascist regime. Miro’s inspiring figure of the Catalan peasant in a state of revolt is the embodiment of a political collectivity - a unified whole against the fascists! The familiar figure of the heroic peasant with his traditional red cap armed with a sickle in revolt is also a symbol of Joan Miro’s nationalist passion. For Republicans at the time, they felt their only weapon left against Franco was uniting people under an authentic sense of culture to battle Franco’s ideological cooptation with Catholicism. In effect, culture eventually became something like a propaganda tool to rally the Spaniards still loyal to the Republic. Joan Miro does not express his concern with the fickle policies of the Republicans and their later swing to the right. Thus, The Reaper is both very clear to read and very complex to understand when put in context to Miro personally.
 

dursyboy:

The Reaper
Joan Miro
1937
(oil on celotex panels)

The Reaper was commissioned by the Spanish Pavilion and was geared towards gaining the support of Republican Spain in an effort to overcome Fransisco Franco’s fascist regime. Miro’s inspiring figure of the Catalan peasant in a state of revolt is the embodiment of a political collectivity - a unified whole against the fascists! The familiar figure of the heroic peasant with his traditional red cap armed with a sickle in revolt is also a symbol of Joan Miro’s nationalist passion. For Republicans at the time, they felt their only weapon left against Franco was uniting people under an authentic sense of culture to battle Franco’s ideological cooptation with Catholicism. In effect, culture eventually became something like a propaganda tool to rally the Spaniards still loyal to the Republic. Joan Miro does not express his concern with the fickle policies of the Republicans and their later swing to the right. Thus, The Reaper is both very clear to read and very complex to understand when put in context to Miro personally.

 

themattsmith:

Calvin & Hobbes superimposed onto real photographs.

I love this so much.

via reddit

(via 6stronghands)

kvrrent:

Koen Lybaert; Oil, 2012, Painting “abstract N° 335”

kvrrent:

Koen Lybaert; Oil, 2012, Painting “abstract N° 335”

(via khar-magas)

robotkamera:

Totem